DC Teachers’ Union Demands What in School Reopening Negotiations?

For nearly a year now, our nation’s schools have been at the mercy of state leadership. For far too many, that means they have been shut down or, at the least, been relegated to remote learning only.

Well, finally it looks like our children may get to go back to school.

Nearly as soon as newly-elected Democratic President Joe Biden was sworn into office, states, cities, and schools all across the US announced they would be reopening in the near future.

Washington DC was one such place. Within hours, and I mean hours, of Biden becoming our official 46th president, Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser announced the reopening of restaurants and bars throughout the city. And a few days later, it was decided that it was time the kids went back to in-person learning.

Of course, school will not be as it was before. According to the Washington Teachers’ Union, some demands must be met first.

In a letter from the union to Mayor Bowser and public schools chancellor, Lewis Ferebee, the teachers listed no small number of demands that must be met if they are to go back to work teaching America’s youth.

Along with following social distancing guidelines and requiring face masks for every child, teacher, and staff member, the union is also demanding a complete shut down on an entire school for no less than 24 hours for cleaning immediately following the confirmation of just one case of COVID.

Furthermore, if an outbreak occurs or positive cases found within school walls, students and teachers must quarantine for at least 14 days.

Additionally, a “Situation Room” must be established in every school where emergency COVID-related issues can be handled. I’m not exactly sure what an emergency COVID situation would look like, other than a case being confirmed and a child sent home, but…

washington teachers union demands

Now, I understand the need for precautions. After all, there is a pandemic going on. But, correct me if I’m wrong, it seems they are taking things a bit too far.

Firstly, science has proven, and rather matter of factly, that the virus doesn’t really affect children all that much. Yes, they can get the disease. However, when they do, according to multiple studies, as Fox News recalled, they “develop only mild symptoms and typically recover within two weeks.”

Another study, this one found in The Lancet, confirmed this by saying, “COVID-19 is generally a mild disease in children, including in infants.”

Furthermore, those same studies show that they rarely pass it on to adults. It’s only other children or students who transmit the disease.

Even the diabolical Dr. Anthony Fauci has confirmed these facts and stated that schools should no longer be closed.

This would seem to imply that sending kids to school is harmless for pretty much everyone involved. Yes, social distancing and mask-wearing, as well as good hygiene, is recommended.

But the question remains if schools aren’t all that dangerous, why did we have them shut down for so long?

Well, turns out, it’s all about the teachers.

Teachers are apparently scared they are going to get it, even though the vast majority of teachers do not fall into the typical ‘at-risk’ category and usually have a much higher and more productive immune system than most.

Either that or they just don’t want to work.

For months and months now, teachers in school districts like DC have been some of the few to capitalize on the pandemic. While schools are closed, either entirely or just for in-person learning, teachers are still being paid, often working far fewer hours than before.

Must be nice to get paid for working and not actually have to even do anything, let alone show up.

Meanwhile, children have been stuck at home, cut off from friends, social interactions, and any real form of education for months. Their getting way behind on lessons, losing out on personal connections, and for some, not getting the proper nutrition, as many low-income children get their most regular and healthy meals at school.

No wonder you have students who feel like they’ve been forgotten.